Monday, September 04, 2006

The Heir to Starewitch



Our new friend, Michael Granberry at Red Hatchet Films just brought a 2003 music video to my attention via his comment at Grant Goans' OAR.

It's a music video entitled, "There, There", directed by Chris Hopewell for Radiohead's 2003 album, Hail to the Thief. (This took a bit of doing to find out.)

It strikes me as a loving and inspired homage to Starewitch's, Fleur De Fougre (clip 1), that I just happened to be watching again the other day at Darkstrider's Brilliant Clip GalleryYou'll notice it immediately when you see the pseudo-rig-look running sequence. As a matter of fact, the entire film is to me an ingenious reproduction of stop-motion puppet movements. And can we talk about how much work must have gone into animating the huge animal tea party scene!? I think our forefathers would be proud of everyone who worked on this wonderful fable film.

There, There on iFilm

a less clear copy on YouTube

UPDATE: On further viewing, I find You tube's clip to be far clearer and without annoying rainbow banding artifact while iFilm's can be viewed larger.

It's the closest thing in spirit to Halfland I've seen yet and I loved the little house in the tree, the lizard/frog creature rolling by on his bicycle in the foreground especially. I saw at least one face profile in the negative space created between the trees of the forest. (But then again I've watched it 10 times already.)

(Wikipedia sites that There, There's director's inspiration was a UK stop motion telly show, Bagpuss. However, I suspect that's a misguided assumption. But still, it seems another cute, successful stop-motion series to know about regardless.)

7 comments:

  1. Anonymous2:05 PM

    "There, There" was pretty scary. Good find. PK

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  2. That's so funny, PK, I never thought of it as scary. I thought if it as an allegorical fable, which you know I love! So the elements of the ravens and the forest were just well rendered aspects for me. Even when the thief stole the coat and was turned into a tree, it was effective in that I felt his shock, pain, and horror, but I found it folktale horror which isn't scary for me somehow.

    I haven't actually seen very many really effective folktale/fables come to life before. This one really pulled off a mean feat! I applaud the work as rare for its attention to poetic atmosphere and rich detail.

    I am obsessed with it now.

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  3. Great video, I love Radiohead...Folktale horror, gothic horror, is beautiful and rare, and ultimately where I want to be...

    I'm lovin' the 'intensive' by the way, its exciting to see you and Mike dukin' it out :) This type of thing should happen more often...

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  4. Oh, wow, I didn't even think about the Starewich connection! Very astute, and thanks for doing the research into who directed that one.

    The man-to-tree transformation reminded me of something from Greek myth, only much more horrific. I'm determined to try and rip that off somehow :)...

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  5. Yeah, this film's totally up your rue, eh, Jeffery!? Except your funny lends a different flavor to the Jenny film that I also love.

    No, thank you for finding it, Michael! I never would even has ever heard about Starewich in any real way if Mike B hadn't curated his incredible gallery. Everythink I know about stop-motion comes from that Mike!

    But wait there's more...

    For sharing that clip with us all, you just won the honor of receiving one of your very own Official Halfland Highly-Collectible Commemorative Limited Edition Buttons if you'd like! Just email me an address via the link on the right and I'll get one right over via the post. heh.

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  6. WOOHOO! I was wondering what one had to do to acquire one of those li'l treasures! It'll go in my animation shrine with all the other cool stuff! :)

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  7. On its way, bro, treasure it.

    (hee)

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